Why PR Can Be Your Greatest Inbound Marketing Tool

inbound marketing toolAlthough inbound marketing is no longer the unique approach it was a few years back, it has developed into an incredibly powerful approach.  It is increasingly becoming a more sophisticated and effective way to reach prospects and clients.

In essence inbound marketing is when clients learn about you and your company organically (through PR, social media and content distribution) and contact you directly.  Traditional public relations is probably the original organic form of inbound marketing.  Unlike TV commercials, print ads or direct marketing mailers, through PR- companies are featured in the media as news stories.  With that type of coverage comes the validation and credibility of being quoted in a major magazine or interviewed on the evening news.   That type of press coverage and exposure builds trust, and it is that trust and credibility that magnifies a call to action.  In this scenario the prospective client reads about you or sees you in the media, or finds content rich articles by you online, views you as an expert and contacts you.

This type of content-based marketing is not about the hard-sell, or being the biggest, or the flashiest, or even the coolest; it is about making a deep powerful connection with your public, about communicating on an authentic level.  Social media, blogging, and traditional public relations are the four most effective inbound marketing tools available.  Using any one of them can be effective.  Creating a marketing campaign that incorporates all of them can turbo charge your marketing efforts and grow your business.

Innovative companies and entrepreneurs are utilizing this basic methodology, understanding that this approach is one of the most powerful and effective brand building tools available.  Here is where traditional PR becomes such an important part of the mix, effective inbound marketing all comes down to creating a compelling, effective story, which is the basic tenant of any successful PR campaign.  For a story to work it must be engaging, interesting and hit a basic human core.

So, when launching an inbound marketing approach, learn from the basics of traditional PR.  It was the first form of marketing that lived or died on the power of the story. Unlike advertising, when it comes to PR, you don’t pay to have a story placed on a specific date and time.  You must craft and pitch a story compelling enough to capture the media’s attention – a story that in essence is strong enough to become the news.

Use that same approach when blogging, or article marketing or working on social media sites and it will serve you well. On the Internet, as in public relations, content is king.  If you offer your readers or target market information they can utilize, if you speak to and address their needs, you will gain a loyal following – and clients will come to you.

Copyright © Anthony Mora Communications 2014

 

 

Showing up is Half the Battle

mountain_climbingI used to work as a personal manager representing actors, writers and musicians.  One lesson that I quickly learned was that those who succeeded accomplished one task repeatedly; they showed up. Sounds simple.  Sounds mundane, but it’s true, that one step put them ahead of nearly 90% of the competition.

Showing up used to be part of my you-can-make-it speech to my new clients.  I’d explain that the competition looked fierce for actors and musicians in L.A., but when you got rid of those that just wanted to be stars and weren’t willing to do the grunt work, then removed the posers, followed by those who were in the game simply because they looked the part but had no real passion or drive, you’d find the competition wasn’t all that great.  A lot of bodies trying for a position, doesn’t necessarily equate to a lot of competition.

The ones you have to worry about are the ones who do the work, refine their craft and show up for each opportunity – repeatedly.  And from my perspective, if you’re a member of the club I just defined, you, in fact, don’t really have to worry about the competition.  You’re in a rarefied field.  There is enough for all.  All you have to worry about is doing your work.  Then you can market and promote and develop your PR strategy.

The same is true in any field.  Showing up and doing the necessary work on a daily basis is half the battle.  Once you’ve nailed down the basics, you can focus on letting your genius shine, be creative and turn the world upside down with your brilliance.  But, that is actually the icing.  Try it without sticking to the basics and the fundamentals, and you’re in trouble.

I remember a creative writing class I took in college.  Whenever I tried to pull what I thought was a brilliant James Joyce or William Burroughs approach, the professor would smile, shake his head and remind me it was my job to learn the rules before I decided to break them.  I thought he just didn’t get it.  Amazing the perspective that time gives.  Yep.  He was right.

So remember, PR and marketing are essential, but first you have to do the basics.  And the beauty is you know the basics, or can learn them.   Once you’re at that point, a public relations campaign can be the wind in your sails that helps you speed forward.   But first, you have to show up.

I used to work as a personal manager representing actors, writers and musicians.  One lesson that I quickly learned was that those who succeeded accomplished one task repeatedly; they showed up. Sounds simple.  Sounds mundane, but it’s true, that one step put them ahead of nearly 90% of the competition.

Showing up used to be part of my you-can-make-it speech to my new clients.  I’d explain that the competition looked fierce for actors and musicians in L.A., but when you got rid of those that just wanted to be stars and weren’t willing to do the grunt work, then removed the posers, followed by those who were in the game simply because they looked the part but had no real passion or drive, you’d find the competition wasn’t all that great.  A lot of bodies jocking for position, doesn’t necessarily equate to a lot of competition.

The ones you have to worry about are the ones who do the work, refine their craft and show up for each opportunity – repeatedly.  And from my perspective, if you’re a member of the club I just defined, you, in fact, don’t really have to worry about the competition.  You’re in a rarefied field.  There is enough for all.  All you have to worry about is doing your work.  Then you can market and promote and develop your PR strategy.

The same is true in any field.  Showing up and doing the necessary work on a daily basis is half the battle.  Once you’ve nailed down the basics, you can focus on letting your genius shine, be creative and turn the world upside down with your brilliance.  But, that is actually the icing.  Try it without sticking to the basics and the fundamentals, and you’re in trouble.

I remember a creative writing class I took in college.  Whenever I tried to pull what I thought was a brilliant James Joyce or William Burroughs approach, the professor would smile, shake his head and remind me it was my job to learn the rules before I decided to break them.  I thought he just didn’t get it.  Amazing the perspective that time gives.  Yep.  He was right.

So remember, PR and marketing are essential, but first you have to do the basics.  And the beauty is you know the basics, or can learn them.   Once you’re at that point, a public relations campaign can be the wind in your sails that helps you speed forward.   But first, you have to show up.

Copyright © Anthony Mora Communications 2014

“Mountain Climbing.” Photo. Mountain Climbing & Vacation Trips. 08. 27 Feb 2014. <http://www.whenwegetthere.com/tourist_attraction/land_tourist_attractions/mountain_climbing/4_108/mountain_climbing.jsp&gt;

3 Paths To More Money, Less Sweat

From Guest Blogger Ann Convery:

1. WEBINARS – UNPARALLELED FOR MAKING MONEY

Yep, you’ve heard of them.

You’ve even done them.

Maybe it’s time to uplevel your opt-in rate and your game.

Did you know?

In terms of event-based marketing – webinars have made
many people more money than anything they’ve ever done.

The majority of Fortune 500 companies use webinars

The majority of Big Name consultants use webinars

Why?

Where else do you have the opportunity to
engage people for a good hour or so?

They can have incredibly high conversion rates.

They are great for facilitating partnerships.

They are your best chance to promote a partnership
out of your league, with a Big Name, if you’re lucky.

Done twice a month, regularly, webinars can bring you
private clients, group coaching clients, and sell your product.

Webinars are excellent lead generators.

AND…

I am now going to giving a plug for LEADPAGES.NET.

I listened to Danny Inny and Clay Collins about
the four most important pages on your site:

  • Opt-In pages that convert up to 70-80%,
  • Lesson Pages that convert 3-4X more than your blog
  • Webinar Squeeze pages that bring you twice the sign-ups
  • Sales Pages that are short, and psyched up to double your conversion

Check this out.

If you are doing webinars, Danny and Clay can send your
conversions out of sight.

And I am not an affiliate!  Just a fan.

2. WORKSHOPS  

Have you thought of adding workshops to your service?

Can you teach the public, or your peers?

If you do a virtual workshop (webinar)
or a live one:

1.  You can become known for your expertise
outside your field.

2. Marketing the workshop takes a bit of work,
but the workshop itself will market YOU.

3. You only have to come up with one workshop,
and you can offer it 4 times a year or once a month.

4. You can sell high-ticket items during your
workshop (people see you in action.)

5. You can charge $495 to $997 for these workshops.

6. 10 people 4 times a year is an extra $40,000.

You do the rest of the math.

 3. SUPPORT CLUBS  

Otherwise known as short-term memberships.

If you have a webinar, or teach a course, or
have a great product, some people may want
short-term support to get going.

So offer a 30-day, or 60-day, or 90-day club.

1. You work with them at your choice -
one full day a month, 2-3 calls per month,
a private forum, limited emails, etc.

2. There is minimal work on your part.

3. They get support and great partnerships.

4. You can upsell them at the end into a
higher-end program.

5. You can even make this evergreen by
creating support videos and postings that
work for the life of your product.

So they can join at any time.

They get massive value and content.

And you only have to get on the phone
for a Q&A once or twice a month.

Private calls with you, of course,
cost a lot more.

6. One 60-day membership for 10 people
at $495 is $4950.

One 60-day membership for 10 people
at $997 is $9970.

I think you can do the rest of the math!

Copyright © Anthony Mora Communications 2013

The 5 Most Asked PR Questions – Answered

q&aHaving been in the PR business for over twenty years, I’ve been asked a number of questions about PR, media relations, marketing, publicity and the media.  Each person has his or her unique concerns, but overall there are five questions that I get repeatedly asked.  With that in mind, I’ve listed them below with a short explanation and response to each

1. Why should we use PR instead of advertising?

It’s less expensive, reaches your target market and gives you the validation and credibility of being featured in the news.

2. What is the difference between PR and marketing?

Public relations is a form of marketing.  It differs from advertising or direct marketing in that through PR you’re presented as a news story.  We pitch and place stories in the media , we do not buy ad or commercial space   PR are reaches your target market, but also offers you the validation of being featured in the media.  Your story is not placed as a commercial or as an ad, but as the news.

3. Why do I need traditional PR in the age of social media?

Traditional PR separates you from others on the various social media platforms; it amplifies and magnifies your social media outreach.  It’s a way of turbo charging your social media campaign.  Almost everyone is online these days, but it’s a select few who have been featured in the media.

4. Do I need a PR firm that specializes in my specific industry?

The industry specialization is not as important as the firm’s overall PR experience.  You need a PR firm that understands how to launch an effective PR campaign.  A PR consultant can learn about a particular industry but if he or she does not understand the PR basics, you’re in trouble.

5. Can’t I launch a PR campaign on my own or hire someone in-house to do the job?

You can, but when you hire a PR firm, you’re hiring a team with experience contacts and know-how.  You’re bringing on board the collective experience, perspective and contacts of an entire firm

If you would like me to elaborate on some of these points or have other questions about PR and marketing, feel free to shoot me an email.

Copyright © Anthony Mora 2013

Spring Breakers Gives Hollywood a Lesson in PR 101

url-1The LA Weekly wrote that Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers is like Godard meets Girls Gone Wild.  The review starts with Jean-Luc Godard’s famous quote “All you need to make a movie is a girl and a gun.”  That quote’s not far off the mark. I’ve read and heard quite a few reviewers make the Girls Gone Wild comparison, although that particular series ended up with a crash and burn scenario.  But where Spring Breakers is gaining most of its coverage is due to the casting.  And in this case it’s not so much that the names carry such weight, but that it’s a film in which a slew of Disney-esque squeaky clean pre- teen idols turned bad… really bad.  Vanessa Hudgens, Selena Gomez and Ashley Benson turn their good girl images on their preverbal heads.  That is the real buzz behind Spring Breakers and what’s causing the media frenzy.   It would have probably received a fair amount of coverage with James Franco and a cast of sexy half- naked gun totting actresses, but it’s the image shift of these particular actresses that has commanded such media attention.

Either Korine is simply incredibly lucky, or this was a very well thought out bit of casting that he understood would be the engine to fuel his PR onslaught once the film was released.  I think we can dismiss the luck theory.  He’s no slouch when it comes to savvy marketing, although this will be his first film to truly break into the mainstream.  And that can primarily be traced to his savvy casting.

'Spring Breakers' Rome Premiere

Regardless what you think of the acting, the story, the direction, or the film itself, there is quite a lot to be learned here from a PR perspective.  This is a perfect example of how a few choice decisions can drive the marketing of a film.  Spring Breakers is generating enough media heat to fuel its sales in a big way.  So the question is, will audiences pay $10 or more to watch Selena Gomez and other good girls go bad?  You bet they will.

Copyright © Anthony Mora 2013

FameFlynet Inc. “51020722 Stars attend the Rome premiere of ‘Spring Breakers’ on February 22, 2013 in Madrid, Spain. Stars attend the Rome premiere of ‘Spring Breakers’ on February 22, 2013 in Madrid, Spain.” Photo. imnotobsessed23 Feb 2013. 19 Mar 2013. <http://imnotobsessed.com/2013/02/23/vanessa-hudgens-selena-gomez-ashley-benson-rachel-korine-spring-breakers-premiere-in-italy/spring-breakers-rome-premiere-4/&gt;

 

Authors, Musicians & PR’s Brave New World

Yes, the music industry has changed and in many ways it’s more challenging than ever before, but with change comes new opportunities.  Success can still be had by those who work to create it.  The traditional major label options aren’t as great and as varied as they were when the Stones or Madonna or REM initially made their marks, but there are now new and different ways to succeed, develop an audience and build a strong career

It’s not only the music industry that has been stood on its head by the internet.  The worlds of publishing, film and TV are also reeling.   In the past authors expected to sign a publishing deal, get an advance and then prepare for a book tour.  Well times have changed.  Fewer and fewer publishing houses are investing in tours unless it’s for one of their reigning literary superstars.  So whereas more and more musical acts are back on the road and touring, fewer and fewer authors are out there meeting the public and bookstore owners.  Book tours are more important than many realize.  They are about making connections with individual stores, store owners and managers.  Even those inevitable signings that end up with a handful of people in the audience can be beneficial, if a relationship is forged between the writer and a bookseller.  Making it even more challenging is the fact that bookstores themselves are facing some of the roughest times they’ve ever encountered. Independents are falling by the wayside; Borders is gone and Barnes & Noble is doing all that it can to simply survive.

As with all types of intellectual property, book sales are being hit hard.  The model that worked so well only a few years ago, is now broken. Still, in both music and publishing as the old models begin to falter, new avenues and opportunities are surfacing.  For musicians and authors that take their careers and their works into their own hands there is a new world of opportunity out there.

The tough part here is that artists either have to become marketers, or they have to hire PR and marketing firms to handle their promotional needs for them.  Particularly in the fields of art and entertainment, marketing cannot be looked at as a luxury.  Marketing, particularly media relations, is a necessity.  The upside to the internet is that every area of interest has its own bloggers and social media sites.  Savvy authors and musicians are using social media, blogging, and article marketing to create an inbound marketing funnel for their books CDs and music downloads.  Some are launching and investing in their own tours, others are offering online events.  Those that are truly savvy are launching traditional public relations campaigns to reach their target market, establish themselves as experts in their field and gain the validation and legitimacy of being in the news.    With the right buzz both musicians and authors can with a bit of creativity generate their own sales and build their fan base, and establish their own successful careers.

Copyright © Anthony Mora 2012

Promoting Your Movie via the Media

You see your job as director or producer (or both) but not as marketer.  Well, if you want to maximize your chances of getting your film out there, it’s time to get comfortable with this new role.  Whether you promote and PR your film on your own or hire a firm to do it for you, you can effectively create a buzz for your film and you will maximize your chances of building your audience and fan base.

By actively promoting your film, you’ll maximize your chances of:

  • Building awareness for your film within the industry
  • Increasing your audience and fan base.
  • Securing a distribution deal.
  • Establishing yourself as a director, producer or writer within the industry.
  • Generating interest for upcoming projects.
  • Securing financing for future projects.

Using PR and media relations to establish your film and/or production company is the most validating and legitimizing route.  By appearing in the media you establish yourself as a presence and a player in the industry.  You gain the validation of be covered by and featured in the news.  I’ve written other articles on how to launch an effective public relations campaign, which would be worth reviewing.  Your best bet is to bring a company or consultant on board that has experience and can work with you to launch an effective campaign.  If that’s not possible, do some homework, learn the process and give it a stab on your own.

Along with launching a PR and media relations outreach consider adding the following:

  • First and foremost create a compelling website or a blog with a compelling design and an easy to read layout.  This doesn’t have to be a bells and whistles affair.  Make it clean, easy to read and simple to navigate.
  • Utilize Social Media including Facebook and Twitter.
  • If you have a small budget for it, consider running Facebook and Google ads; consider forum marketing.
  • Edit some compelling, short videos to use as teasers for your film
  • Tag your videos.  Be sure to use keywords that effectively describe your videos in the associated tags for effective SEO.
  • Submit your video to directories and social bookmarking sites to help up your Google ranking

There is quite a lot you can do to help market, publicize and promote your film.  I believe that the most effective approach is to combine blogging and social media marketing with  traditional PR and media relations.  As a filmmaker, this is an exciting time.  Now more than ever you can take steps that can help ensure the success of your projects and your careers.  Be bold.  Go for it.
See you at the movies.

Copyright © Anthony Mora 2012

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